Pakistan records most daily COVID cases since pandemic began

Reading Time: 2 minutes

KARACHI, Pakistan, Jan 21 (Reuters) – Pakistan reported on Friday over 7,000 COVID-19 cases in a single day, its highest daily number of infections since the pandemic began, as the south Asian nation imposes new restrictions to curb the fast-spreading Omicron variant.

At least 7,678 cases in the past 24 hours pushed the positivity ratio to 12.93%, the highest ever in the last two years, 23 deaths were also reported in the last 24 hours, according to data from the National Command Operation Centre (NCOC), which is overseeing the pandemic response.

Karachi, the country’s largest city, recorded its highest ever positivity ratio of 46.58% in the last 24 hours.

“Amid rising trend of disease across the country a ban on indoor dinning in cities/districts with positivity above 10% has been imposed with effect from January 21,” said a notification issued by (NCOC).

The government authorised booster vaccination shots for citizens over the age of 30. Vaccination of children over the age of 12 has been made mandatory to attend the schools and children under 12 will attend schools with 50% attendance.

“We might see a peak after two weeks followed by a gradual decline,” Faisal Mahmood associate professor of infections diseases at Aga Khan University Hospital told Geo television channel on Friday morning.

He said the number of hospitalisations are rising, citing the on-going wedding season for the rapid spread of the virus.

About 70 million people in Pakistan, or 32% of the population, have had two vaccine doses.

The infection numbers are lower compared to other countries, such as neighbouring India – but Pakistan tests 50 to 60 thousand people a day with a population of 220 million compared to India where around 1.9 million tests are being done per day.

Reporting by Syed Raza Hassan; Editing by Michael Perry

Photo – Children peer out of the window of their home during a lockdown of Punjab province due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, in Lahore, Pakistan. EPA-EFE/RAHAT DAR

Once you're here...