Our website use cookies to improve and personalize your experience and to display advertisements(if any). Our website may also include cookies from third parties like Google Adsense, Google Analytics, Youtube. By using the website, you consent to the use of cookies. We have updated our Privacy Policy. Please click on the button to check our Privacy Policy.

Smoke from US wildfires reaches Europe

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Smoke from the fires devastating swathes of the U.S. West Coast has reached as far as Europe, the European Union’s climate monitoring service revealed in its assessment of the “unprecedented” blazes.

Satellite data from the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) showed that the wildfires currently raging across California, Oregon and Washington are “tens to hundreds of times more intense” than the recent average.

Thanks to strong pressure systems, the smoke from the fires was trapped along the western part of North America for days, making for potentially dangerous air quality in major cities such as Portland, Oregon and Vancouver and San Francisco.

A handout photo made available 15 September 2020 by the European Space Agency, ESA, and captured on 10 September, this Copernicus Sentinel-3 image shows the extent of the smoke plume which, in some areas, has caused the sky to turn orange in western US coastal area. In this image, multiple fires can be seen in the states of California, Washington and Oregon – the areas hit hardest by the blazes – producing the thick plume of smoke which can be seen travelling westwards. Based on additional data from the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission, the smoke was visible travelling 2000 km west of the active fires. The cities of Portland, Eureka, Eugene, San Francisco and Sacramento are all blanked in smoke. In the top of the image, the cities of Vancouver and Seattle are visible. EPA-EFE/ESA HANDOUT HANDOUT

CAMS said that it had tracked the long-range transport of smoke particles from the fires as far as 8,000 kilometres to the east — reaching northern Europe.

It estimated that the blazes, which are significantly more likely to occur as the planet warms, have spewed out more than 30 million tonnes of carbon dioxide since mid-August.

The blazes have already burned nearly five million acres (two million hectares) across the U.S. West, torching an area roughly the size of the state of New Jersey, with fears the death toll of 35 may rise.

Related Posts

%d bloggers like this: