Denmark doctor says Eriksen ‘was gone’ after ‘cardiac arrest’

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Denmark’s team doctor said Christian Eriksen “was gone” after suffering a “cardiac arrest” during Denmark’s Euro 2020 opener against Finland on Saturday.

“He was gone; we did cardiac resuscitation, it was a cardiac arrest. We got him back after one defib (defibrillation),” Morten Boesen told a news conference, adding that Eriksen remained in hospital for further tests after his collapse on Saturday.

“The exams that have been done so far look fine,” Boesen added. “We don’t have an explanation to why it happened.” Coach Kasper Hjulmand said Eriksen had told him he did not remember much from Saturday’s collapse and that he was eager to get back on to the pitch.

“He would like for us to play on,” Hjulmand said. “He said he feels like he could go out and play again. Christian feels best when he’s got a football close to his feet.”

Hjulmand quoted the midfielder as saying: “I think you are feeling worse than I am. I feel as if I’m about to go training now, boys.”

“Christian is in good spirits and it’s a huge relief for the players after all this uncertainty,” Hjulmand said. “There is no doubt that we have been on the ropes.”

Messages of support for Eriksen, who plays for Inter Milan, have poured in.

The Group B game was halted and eventually restarted an hour and 45 minutes later. Finland went on to win 1-0 with their only attempt of the game.

Former Danish internationals Peter Schmeichel and Michael Laudrup have criticised governing body UEFA over their handling of the collapse. The players were given the option to finish the game on Saturday evening or on Sunday.

It’s a ridiculous decision by UEFA, they should have tried to work out a different scenario and shown a little bit of compassion, and they didn’t,” Schmeichel, whose son Kasper was in goal for Denmark when the incident occurred, told the BBC.

“Something terrible like that happens and UEFA gives the players an option to go out and play the game or come back at 1200 on Sunday. What kind of option is that?”

After a long suspension, the game resumed at 2030 CET and the Finns went on to win 1-0 but Peter Schmeichel, who was part of the Danish side that won the Euros in stunning fashion in 1992, would have preferred to see it called off.

“There is no way that game should have been played last night. Not one player on that pitch was in the right mindset to be playing a game of football,” he said.

His sentiments were echoed by Laudrup, widely considered to be one of the greatest players ever to play for Denmark.

“When such things happen, you are in the throes of your emotions, and you do not have the capacity and oversight to make important decisions. There must be someone who says ‘now we’re going to do this, and now we stop here’,” he told Denmark’s TV3.

“They were given a choice that is not a choice — play tonight, or play tomorrow at 12. I think that, I’m sorry, but that is not a choice,” Laudrup said.

Earlier

Denmark’s Eriksen still in hospital, condition is stable

Denmark midfielder Christian Eriksen remained in hospital and was in stable condition on Sunday, after collapsing during his side’s Euro 2020 opening match with Finland and being given CPR on the pitch on Saturday, the Danish football association said.

“This morning we have spoken to Christian Eriksen, who has sent his greetings to his teammates. His condition is stable, and he continues to be hospitalized for further examination,” Danish FA DBU said on Twitter.

Eriksen, 29, collapsed suddenly in the 42nd minute of the match while running near the left touchline after a Denmark throw-in. As a hush fell over the 16,000-strong crowd, his teammates gathered around him while he was treated on the pitch and then carried off on a stretcher.

“The team and the staff of the national team has received crisis assistance and will continue to be there for each other after yesterday’s incident,” DBU said.

“We would like to thank everyone for the heartfelt greetings to Christian Eriksen from fans, players, the royal families from both Denmark and England, international associations, clubs etc,” it said.

Messages of support for Eriksen, who plays for Inter Milan, have poured in.

Denmark midfielder Christian Eriksen remained in hospital and was in stable condition on Sunday, after collapsing during his side’s Euro 2020 opening match with Finland and being given CPR on the pitch on Saturday, the Danish football association said.

“This morning we have spoken to Christian Eriksen, who has sent his greetings to his teammates. His condition is stable, and he continues to be hospitalized for further examination,” Danish FA DBU said on Twitter.

Eriksen, 29, collapsed suddenly in the 42nd minute of the match while running near the left touchline after a Denmark throw-in. As a hush fell over the 16,000-strong crowd, his teammates gathered around him while he was treated on the pitch and then carried off on a stretcher.

“The team and the staff of the national team has received crisis assistance and will continue to be there for each other after yesterday’s incident,” DBU said.

“We would like to thank everyone for the heartfelt greetings to Christian Eriksen from fans, players, the royal families from both Denmark and England, international associations, clubs etc,” it said.

Messages of support for Eriksen, who plays for Inter Milan, have poured in.

Inter director says Eriksen did not have COVID, was not vaccinated

Inter Milan director Giuseppe Marotta has dismissed suggestions that club midfielder Christian Eriksen had previously contracted COVID-19.

Sanjay Sharma of St. George’s University of London, the playmaker’s cardiologist at former club Tottenham Hotspur, said Eriksen had no prior heart issues during his time with the Premier League side.

However, he told the Mail on Sunday that some players may have had sub-clinical COVID-19 infections, which could have resulted in “scarring” of the heart.

Marotta dismissed that suggestion.

“He didn’t have COVID and wasn’t vaccinated either,” he told Rai Sport.

He said Eriksen was under the guidance of the Danish medical staff and it was for them to release information but Inter had been in touch with them.

“I can say the Inter medical staff have been in contact with them from the start.”

Sharma said Eriksen had returned normal tests at Spurs since 2013, but the sight of the player falling to the ground had briefly raised concerns that doctors had missed something.

“I thought, ‘Oh my God? Is there something there that we didn’t see?’ But I have looked at all the test results and everything looked perfect,” Sharma said.

“From the day we signed him, it was my job to screen him and we tested him every year. So certainly his tests up to 2019 were completely normal, with no obvious underlying cardiac fault. I can vouch for that because I did the tests.”

Former Bolton Wanderers midfielder Fabrice Muamba said that Eriksen’s collapse brought back painful memories of his cardiac arrest on the pitch in an FA Cup match in 2012. The ex-England under-21 midfielder had to retire soon after at the age of 24.

It brought back stuff that I have put down in me, this emotion that’s down there. To watch it from that distance and not know what was going to happen,” Muamba told the BBC.

“It was scary, but credit to the medical staff. They have done an amazing job on Christian. I like how his teammates got together to protect him.

“I hope things turn out to be OK for him. I hope he’ll come through.”