Oil prices rise as weaker dollar offsets China COVID-19 concerns

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Oil prices rose on Tuesday, paring losses from the previous session, as a weaker U.S. dollar offset widening COVID-19 curbs in China that have stoked fears of slowing fuel demand in the world’s second-largest oil consumer.

Brent crude for January delivery LCOc1 rose 73 cents, or 0.8%, to $93.54 a barrel at 0406 GMT. The December contract expired on Monday at $94.83 a barrel, down 1%.

Brent crude for January delivery rose 73 cents, or 0.8%, to $93.54 a barrel at 0406 GMT. The December contract expired on Monday at $94.83 a barrel, down 1%.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude rose 58 cents, or 0.7%, to $87.11 a barrel, after falling 1.6% in the previous session.

The Brent and WTI benchmarks both ended October higher, their first monthly gains since May, after the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and allies including Russia said they would cut output by 2 million barrels per day (bpd).

“Oil prices cut early losses as the U.S. dollar weakened, with the major global equity markets rising in today’s Asian session ahead of the U.S. Federal Reserve’s rate decision later this week,” CMC Markets analyst Tina Teng said.

via Reuters

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