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Photostory: 500 years of Leonardo Da Vinci

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Museums and galleries are marking 500 years from the death of Leonardo da Vinci anniversary.

On Thursday, The presidents of France and Italy laid a wreath on the tomb of Leonardo da Vinci, who died in the French town of Amboise exactly 500 years ago.

French and Italian presidents attend da Vinci anniversary at Chateau de Chambord
French President Emmanuel Macron (R) speaks with Italian President Sergio Mattarella (L) outside the Chambord Castle after the commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the death of Italian Renaissance painter and scientist Leonardo da Vinci, in Chambord, France. Photo: EPA-EFE/YOAN VALAT / POOL

Da Vinci died on May 2, 1519 and was buried four days later in the chapel of Clos Luce, according to his wishes. But his remains went missing in 1811, when the monument was destroyed by the castle’s new owner.

French and Italian presidents attend da Vinci anniversary at Chateau d'Amboise
French President Emmanuel Macron (R) and Italian President Sergio Mattarella pay their respects at the tomb of Italian renaissance painter and scientist Leonardo da Vinci to commemorate the 500th anniversary of his death, at the Saint-Hubert Chapel during a visit at the Chateau d’Amboise. Photo: EPA-EFE/PHILIPPE WOJAZER / POOL

He was born April 15, 1452 in the small Italian town of Vinci, northwest of Florence

In the meantime, the portrait will go on display alongside about 200 drawings from the monarch’s huge collection of Leonardo works at the Queen’s Gallery in Buckingham Palace from May 24 to Oct. 13.

 

Newly identified Leonardo da Vinci portrait to go on display for the first time
Royal Collection Trust

 

This portrait was newly identified as Leonardo da Vinci, is going on display in London as the world marks the 500th anniversary of the death of the artist and inventor.

Only one other portrait has survived from the artist’s lifetime, aside from self-portraits.

Martin Clayton was researching an exhibition for The Queen’s Gallery in London when he identified the sketch as a study of Leonardo made by an unidentified assistant shortly before the master’s death in 1519.

The only other contemporary image is by his pupil, Francesco Melzi, created around the same time, seen below.

Newly identified Leonardo da Vinci portrait to go on display for the first time
Royal Collection Trust

Sotheby’s announced Thursday that a major, rarely seen Leonardo drawing is going on display in New York. It was last displayed publicly in 2003.

Leonardo created the pen-and-ink drawing in 1506, at the same time he was working on the “Mona Lisa.”

The auction house is hanging “Leda and the Swan” in its Manhattan galleries next month as part of an exhibition of treasures from Chatsworth, one of Britain’s grandest country houses.

In his birthplace, A lock of what Italian experts believe is Leonardo da Vinci’s hair will go on public display for the first time this week, to mark the 500th anniversary of the death of the great Italian painter and Renaissance giant. This is part of the “Leonardo Vive” exhibition in Vinci.

Leonardo da Vinci hair relic exhibited in Vinci
A hair relic attributed to Leonardo da Vinci is on display in the exhibition ‘Leonardo Vive’ (Leonardo is alive) at the Museo Ideale di Vinci in Vinci, Florence, Italy. The lock of hair, which may have belonged to Leonardo, is being shown in Vinci by the Italian scholar Alessandro Vezzosi in conjunction with the opening of two museums in the town and the 500-year death of Leonardo da Vinci. Photo: EPA-EFE/GIANNI NUCCI